www.paydaybur.co.uk

Dame Judi Dench at the Unveiling and Dedication of ‘The Conversion of St Paul’

Dame Judi Dench delighted guests at St Paul’s Church in Covent Garden by formally launching the sculpture by renowned Bruce Denny.  The 80 yr old, resplendent in a beautiful cream outfit,  commented that although she’d been unable to see the eclipse earlier that morning, she was pleased to see the sun now shining and declared it was ‘…  a wonderful way to welcome Bruce Denny’s lovely statue’.  The cutting of the ribbon followed a formal service held in the church, commonly referred to as The Actor’s Church, with the Rev’d Richard Syms and the Rev’d Simon Grigg in the presence of the Deputy Lord Mayor of Westminster, the former Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowen Williams, and numerous actors/actresses.

www.lucyelliottphotography.com
www.thekensingtonmagazine.com

Images and copyright:  Lucy Elliott

 

British Soldier takes on gruelling 20 days of fitness exercise to raise money for Royal Hospital Chelsea

 

Staff Sergeant Stephen Hughes (27) who is currently serving in the Royal Army Physical Training Corps in Kabul undertook a gruelling 20 days of 20 different physical challenges to raise money for Royal Hospital Chelsea.  The ‘Reps to Remember’ 20 tough physical exercises were chosen to mark the number of British Forces operational tours of Afghanistan, and to repeat them 453 times, equating to the number of British Soldiers who lost their lives in the region.

Stephen said of his fundraising challenge in Kabul, “The ‘Reps to Remember’ challenges were extremely tough; far harder than I had anticipated. Thinking about the Chelsea Pensioners at the Royal Hospital Chelsea, where my comrades and I may live in our retirement and the 453 service personnel who sadly lost their lives in Afghanistan definitely got me through it. I’m really pleased that 240 people were moved to donate to this great cause.”

Kate Marsh, Fundraising Manager at the Royal Hospital Chelsea, said, “Now that Stephen has completed these challenges we are even more in awe of his efforts than we were before. He is a true inspiration and we are delighted that the public got behind him to very nearly reach his target of £5,000 for the Royal Hospital Chelsea.” (To date Stephen has raised £4,734. Donations are still being accepted at http://bit.ly/reps2remember).

www.thekensingtonmagazine.com

Images and copyright:  Lucy Elliott www.lucyelliottphotography.com

www.chelsea-pensioners.co.uk

 

 

Gravetye Manor: Hotel, Restaurant and World Renowned Garden

Gravetye Manor is a small Elizabethan country house set in 1000 acres of the Sussex Downs. Built by Richard Infield for his bride Katherine in 1598 it is a beautifully proportioned house, with 17 bedrooms individually decorated in contemporary furnishings, but with large windows, wood panelled walls, and some with fireplaces and four-poster beds. There are several cosy sitting rooms, private dining rooms for families/larger parties all complete with roaring fires and abundant simple but beautiful floral arrangements.

Gravetye Manor is a delight for those interested in architecture, food or traditional English Gardens and is a member of Relais et Chateaux and Pride of Britain. It is rapidly gaining a fast reputation for the standard of food offered on the menu, prepared by Head Chef George Blogg and his team. Produce is supplied by local suppliers (mainly from Sussex) or in the case of most of the required fruit or vegetables, from their own kitchen garden or glass houses.

The 35 acres of garden really developed in 1884 when William Robinson redesigned the gardens, incorporating a more informal ‘English Garden’ look, than the previously traditional, formal Victorian garden. The garden is looked after by Head Gardener Tom Coward and his team of five full-time gardeners. It includes one of the oldest semi-circular walled kitchen in Europe (1.5 acres), glasshouses, lake and various different ‘gardens’ including a wild meadow. Great banks of flowers include snowdrops (and of course, the Gravetye species), daffodils, tulips, roses, clematis, rhododendrums, bluebells etc. feature throughout the 35 acres.

The Manor holds events throughout the year such as champagne/wine tasting, floral arrangements, and guided walks/talks around the gardens. It is within close proximity to East Grinstead or Gatwick airport and thus makes it highly convenient to visit from London, either for the day or a weekend. Guests who wish to visit Glyndbourne whilst staying at Gravetye are guaranteed tickets – usually highly sought after and difficult to obtain.

Gravetye looks beautiful throughout the year, but the gardens are particularly magnificent in April/May when the spring bulbs show through. When we visited we were lucky enough to wake up to snow – completely magical.

We would highly recommend this beautiful, small and personal country house hotel. A true escape from London and yet within a short space of time, you can be in a completely different world. A world where courtesy, charm, tranquility and professionalism are all taken as a matter of course.

Lucy & Stephen were guests of Gravetye Manor

www.gravetyemanor.co.uk

www.thekensingtonmagazine.com

Images and copyright:  Lucy Elliott www.lucyelliottphotography.com

HRH Duchess of Cornwall visits Holland Park School and meets winner of Creative Writing Competition by First Story

HRH Duchess of Cornwall delighted staff and students last week by visiting Holland Park School in Kensington. Shown around the futuristic looking new school by Head Teacher Coliin Hall, she clearly enjoyed seeing the building and popping in to join in various classes. Admitting that neither Latin nor Science were her particular favourite, it was clear she was more comfortable in the English classes. In addition she visited three classrooms holding ‘creative writing’ classes with schools from across the country, participating in the charity, First Story of which the Duchess is Patron. She was clearly at ease and didn’t just speak with children at the front of the class but ventured to the very back, ensuring every child could claim to have met the Duchess, in years to come. Those who were invited to speak to read out their work, were in the main, rather nervous, but with her encouragement and genuine enthusiasm, nerves were soon dispelled and children from disadvantaged background proved that with the right type of care and nurturing, anything is possible.

The Duchess then attended a synopsis of the Staff production of Much Ado About Nothing, at the end of which she announced and met the winner of the creative writing competition 2014-15. In turn she was presented with a bouquet of flowers and a professionally produced anthology of work by the pupils of First Story. Finally she gave a speech in which she surmised that due to the high standard she had seen that morning, it could well be that one of these pupils may be a famous writer in the future. Inspiration indeed!

www.thekensingtonmagazine.com
www.hollandparkschool.co.uk

www.firststory.org.uk

All images and copyright: Lucy Elliott
www.lucyelliottphotography.com

Classic but contemporary: The Oyster Box Hotel, Durban, South Africa

The Oyster Box Hotel on the ocean coast of Umhlanga (exotically pronounced Umshlanga) is a colonial but modern, beautiful hotel just outside Durban. Conveniently located for the airport, it is clearly making a name for itself, both as a hotel for visitors, and a destination for locals. The famed ‘Lighthouse Bar’ was packed the evening we visited – overlooking the Lighthouse, with the waves crashing on a summers balmy evening it seemed a far cry from our very cold and chilly London.

Equally busy was lunchtime on the Terrace, overlooking the pool and the ocean. Staff wearing colonial type uniform, beaming away, carrying plates of huge salads, skewers of fish or curries (for which the hotel is famous). Afternoon tea is provided inside and comprises a huge table filled high with cakes, biscuits, scones and sandwiches. So much so this was providing the backdrop for many couples having a romantic and traditional English Tea.

We visited The Oyster Box some 15 years ago – it was a rather sad hotel clearly lacking love or attention. Taken over by Red Carnation Hotel in 2009 it now has both and doesn’t need the beacon of the lighthouse to make it stand out from the crowd. With only 86 rooms and some 600 staff, customer service is top notch, professional and well executed.

There is a separate building for the Spa, individual ‘villa or loft type’ rooms and a Presidential Suite – secluded and offering all the privacy the celebrities or VIPs who stay, need. Weddings are very popular here and the hotel has a special outside area to host these prior to sitting down in splendour in one of the huge dining rooms.

Children are well catered for and made very welcome, with children’s clubs and films, held in the hotel’s very own Cinema Room, complete with popcorn.

If you ever only go to one hotel in Durban, make it the Oyster Box – classic, classy, contemporary and convivial.

www.oysterboxhotel.com

Images and copyright:  www.lucyelliottphotography.com

www.thekensingtonmagazine.com

Life in the Bush: Molori Safari Lodge in Madikwe Game Reserve South Africa

We recently had the honour of reviewing Molori Safari Lodge in the Madikwe Game Reserve for our March Travel edition ‘Out of Kensington’.  Madikwe is a malarial-free area, some 400 km from Johannesburg and is home to the Big Five and some 350 different species of birds. Here is an excerpt from our diary:

We are having such an amazing experience and really feel we have arrived!  Molori Safari Game lodge is wonderful – very small, very understated smart, serious customer service, lovely people and no bling in sight.  We were given a two bedroom exec ‘suite’ – more like a lovely house with its own pool over looking a watering hole – the first lunchtime about 20 elephants paraded to it – along with a couple of babies – a wonderful sight.  We were v lucky as we never saw this again, and they didn’t stay long.

Game drives are typically about 4 – 6 hours long (in a session) which go surprisingly fast.  We have an excellent guide who has not been to uni, but is the most intelligent person I’ve ever met.  He is paying to send his children to private school, which I suspect is a first for an African guide.   He is extremely passionate and enthusiastic.  Highlights were coming across two lions who had just killed a wildebeest and had eaten so much they were hyperventilating; having dinner in the bush – table cloths, candles etc with the owners of the lodge and their family who happened to be on holiday at the same time as us (here think the South African equivalent of Richard Branson).  Very friendly and welcoming as were his kids (early 20s) and wife.  There was a tea-candlelit path to the loo which I expected to be a hole in the ground but no, behind a little wooden fence sat a rather splendid porcelain white loo – facing onto the bush with the stars above.

The next day we went for a night safari and came across a leopard, apparently snoozing, but a minute later was up chasing a poor baby rhino who was stuck in the mud in a watering hole.  With fierce defence and defiance from its mother the leopard backed off. The guide then cooked us a stew in the bush, this time more informal, just with some camping chairs etc. but with a very full large freezer box, akin to a full bar – plenty of whiskey.  After a lesson in astronomy we packed up at about 10.30 pm. went to see how the lions were getting on with their feasting, had a good look and then realised the jeep had a puncture.  Now this was scary stuff.  One lion a good distance off, the other about 6 – 10 feet (depending upon who you spoke to) – I reckon probably about 7 ft. However, close enough.  We managed to get the jeep a few feet further away, turned it around, and then the guide changed it – Stephen with a large spotlight to track the nearer lion, and me with a smaller torch to shine on the wheel, guide and jeep.  He managed it in about 10 minutes and then we were off.  I was rather frightened but the other lady with us was genuinely terrified.

Next day I went out on my own with the guide, for a walking safari – I thought I was very brave and that we’d been out for an hour and walked miles, but it turned out we had only gone about 500 metres!  Really interesting and learnt more about nature, biology, science and animals/birds than had done in a lifetime.  We then came across a cheetah lying under a tree.  The guide turned the jeep round (being a fellow photographer), so we had the best angle – I lay on the floor of the jeep (being the only one in it, I had plenty of room) and then played eyeball with the cheetah.  At first it was fun/an experience, but the longer it went on the more unnerved I became, so I then demanded that we move.  The most incredible sight and when we returned and the guide was beaming saying that was magnificent/amazing, for someone who goes into the bush every day, was really something.  This is an amazing trip.  They do rhino conservation too but we haven’t been able to see that in action as we hadn’t got the right passes.  All in all this is a trip of a lifetime and far surpasses the other three I’ve been on in the past.

With thanks to Jonathan Peach of JPS Luxury Safari’s for arranging this trip:  www.jpsluxurysafaris.com

Lucy & Stephen were guests of Molori Safari Lodge, and flew with Trailfinders.

Copyright and images:  www.lucyelliottphotography.com

HRH The Duchess of Cambridge formerly opens Kensington Aldridge Academy and the Kensington Leisure Centre

Yesterday HRH The Duchess of Cambridge officially offended the new Kensington Aldridge Academy and Kensington Leisure Centre.  The new facilities stand on the site of the former leisure centre where, during their time at Wetherby School, both Their Royal Highnesses The Duke  of Cambridge and Prince Harry had swimming lessons.

Her Royal Highness toured the academy, met Principal David Benson, students and staff, and sat in on a geography and RE lesson.  The Duchess then enjoyed a short presentation from students in the theatre before unveiling a plaque to commemorate her visit (and being given a posy from 3 year old Florence Aldridge).  Before leaving the Duchess visited the academy’s Creates Hub for young entrepreneurs, and met students are are designing items for sale at Portobello Road Market.

Her Royal Highness then took a short walk to the leisure centre, due to open to residents of Kensington in March, to tour the state of the art facilities and watch sporting displays from local primary school children and other community groups.  She then attended a reception to meet those involved in the project and unveiled a plaque to mark her visit to the leisure centre.

www.thekensingtonmagazine.com

Images & Copyright:  Lucy Elliott / www.lucyelliottphotography.com

Local illustrator and poster designer Dorrit Dekk dies

Local resident Dorrit Dekk (Dorrit Epstein Dekk) died on 29th December at the age of 97. In May 2011 we met her to discuss a forthcoming article which was printed in our June edition. Seven years before she held an exhibition at the Duncan Campbell Gallery in W8, and later a private exhibition with a friend. Sales of her work flew off the walls. Noted for her direct approach, she was genuinely interested in people, of all ages, and of all walks of life. She had been looked after for the past 13 years by Mary, who became a trusted and good friend to Dorrit.

Below is a copy of the original article printed published in June 2011:

Hidden Talent: Dorrit Dekk
“Dorrit, hi, I’m just phoning to thank you for inviting me to your exhibition last night. How are you?” “Oh my dear, well I’m still here, I seem to be completely indestructible” says Dorrit (with a distinct heavy accent), a 94 year old resident of Kensington who still paints, although dismisses the notion she is a ‘fine artist’. Instead she calls herself an art designer and her works range from abstract designs to quirky land/townscapes – with a particular bias for backstreets and their inhabitants.

Dorrit was born in Czechoslovakia but moved to Austria and studied theatre design at the prestigious Kunstgewerbe Schule from 1936-1938. Sadly the War intervened and her professor had to encourage her to leave as suddenly the college was no longer allowed to take any Jewish students. Her month’s English friends provided visas and guarantees, hence her mother, Dorrit and her brother came over to live in London. Dorrit was able to continue her studies at the Reimann School in London. She then worked in the WRMS as a radio intelligence officer, intercepting E-boat signals.

Later, as work in theatre design after the war was rather scarce, she moved to graphic design and worked for the Central office of Information (1946-1948) producing poster designs and illustrations for this government body. One day a printer came back with one of her posters and asked whey she had not signed it. Explaining her married name was Klatzow and maiden name Fuhrmann she did not eel either of these lent themselves very well to a signature. he asked what her initials were – DKK. So with the insertion of an ‘E’ Dorrit’s pen name became DEKK (signed for evermore in capitals). From the 1950s she ran her own (and very successful) design practice, when a chance conversation led her to designing a stand entitled ‘People at Play’ of the Land Traveller part of the Festival of Britain. The subject of the stand was British Sports and Games and included a large mural across the stand. This proved very popular and Dorrit is one of the few surviving contributors to the Festival of Britain exhibition. She can be seen on interview at the 60th Anniversary celebration being shown at the Southbank Centre.

Dorrit has always worked in gouache but her main medium in collage which she used for her posters and now for her paintings. Her works are bright and fun with unusual depth and texture. Hence when she starts on a piece there is no plan (“it just happens”), no idea of the end result, but rather an evolvement of what “jewels happen to be lying on the floor” at th time. This might seem a somewhat unorthodox approach to ‘art’ but then Picasso was famous for much the same approach!

Dorrit has lived in Airlie Gardens since the late 60s and must be one of the rfew people who can remember the beautiful Victorian water tower and the line of oak trees (now Kensington Heights). From her roof terrace she used to be able to see as far as Highgate Cemetery. It clearly still irks her that in the early 1970s Sir John Betjeman would not support a band of women chaining themselves to the oak tree in order to prevent the planning permission.

Just over ten years ago Dorrit had a stroke and since that time has had to use a wheel chair to get about. Years later on one of her ‘get a bouts’ and just before her 90th birthday, Dorrit met Duncan Campbell of the Duncan Campbell Gallery. Duncan encouraged her to have an exhibition, but she felt at 90 she was too old to work, and even more, to hold a solo exhibition. But she did – the exhibition was a huge success and gave many the opportunity to buy her works. As a result of Duncan “giving her a reason to live” she now continues to ‘work’ in the afternoon and just last month gave another (and extremely successful) private exhibition.

Like most ‘older’ people we interview for this page we never have room to mention all the aspects of Dorrit’s life; her first love of her life: a “handsome, brilliant physicist” who died in the war, or her second husband. But for the purpose of this article, she is a graphic artist and painter. And someone who remains, certainly at the time of writing, completely indestructible.

Copyright: The Kensington Magazine

 

First World War Commemoration: The Great War Centenary Parade with HRH Prince and Princess Michael of Kent at Royal Hospital Road, Chelsea

Royal Hospital Chelsea marked this occasion with a rather spectacular ‘The Great War Centenary Parade’ where 40 Edwardian cars were driven by their owners and accompanied by Chelsea Pensioners, whose predecessors had fought in the War, from the Hospital to the Imperial War Museum. The event was organised by Nicholas Pellett whose grandfather was killed in the first World War and was held in the presence of HRH Prince and Princess Michael of Kent.

Image and copyright: Lucy Elliott www.lucyelliottphotography.com

www.thekensingtonmagazine.com

Hugh Grant attends Flannels 4 Heroes Cricket Match at Burton Court, Chelsea

The fourth Flannels4Heroes cricketing event took place at Burton Court, Chelsea.  Organised by Sarah Ducker of SJD Events, four teams provided the backdrop to the perfect English Garden Party for some 300 guests.  Sponsored by Dackers the event has to date raised over £100,000 for Help for Heroes, Combat Stress, Walkwith with the Wounded and the On Course Foundation.  Lending their support to the day were a variety of VIPs, amongst whom was keen cricket player, Hugh Grant.  Looking every bit as dashing as when he was manning a book shop in Notting Hill!

Images and copyright:  Lucy Elliott  www.lucyelliottphotography.com

www.thekensingtonmagazine.com