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The Design Museum: The Final Journey – From Commonwealth Institute to the completion of a Vision

These entries have been taken from past entries in our Blog – A diary of progress: from the final days of the Commonwealth Institute, the development of the Design Museum, and its opening in November 2017:

To start at the beginning (September 2011):  As part of Open London Weekend, the Commonwealth Institute opened its doors to the public for the very last time, before works start on the new Design Museum.  This was a tremendous opportunity for people who love architecture or photographic architecture to take advantage of the tour provided.

The Design Museum will be moving to the former Commonwealth Institute in 2014. The building has, sadly, been empty for over 10 years, but during the tours it was evident many had been before, some in their school days and those who could remember their first impressions of ‘seeing other cultures’ being exposed to anthropology for the very first time.  Apparently it was quite ahead of its time, with plenty of activities to involve school children and generate their love and understanding of our commonwealth cousins.  And not least to mention the glass clad walls, which was considered innovative in the 1960s and is still used now in many modern buildings.

The internal remodelling of the building will be carried out by John Pawson Architects. The new Design Museum is expected to welcome half a million visitors to its exhibitions every year, offer 60,000 learning opportunities and display the museum’s important collection of twentieth and twenty-first century design. Design studios and workshops, a library, restaurant, cafe and auditorium will be housed in a beautiful, state of the art building underneath the stately curves of the original 1962 copper and concrete roof.

Originally the Commonwealth Institute housed an exhibition celebrating the fifty four nations of the Commonwealth. It was an undisputed icon of British post-war architecture. The radial deisgn inside extends out from a marble circular platform which stands at the centre of the square building’s diameter and at the exact mid – point of its height. On entering the building the visitor arrives on the platform, at the central point of a huge spatial volume – a powerful first impression. This platform situates the spectator not only at the centre of the Exhibition Hall but at the symbolic centre of the world of the Commonwealth. From here the visitor could ‘travel’ the staircases to visit the many different countries represented here. The most striking feature of the Exhibition Hall is the complex hyperbolic paraboloid roof. Its copper cladding was designed to mellow in harmony with the greens of Holland Park. Its tent like exterior lines complement the park’s soft treelines. Building materials donated by Commonwealth countries augmented the tiny budget for design and construction. Zambia donated 25 tonnes of copper from its mines. Unfortunately, this arrived in the form of copper ore and had to be processed before it could be applied to the roof. Much of the hardwood used in the flooring and other applications also come from Commonwealth donors.

The building was designed by the distinquished practice of Robert Matthew Johnson-Marshall and Partners. James Gardner was the exhibition designer – he had been the principal designer to the Festival of Britain an his work on the Commonwealth Institute revived and impr9oved on may of the innovations he had developed there. Dame Sylvia Crower designed the landscaped gardens. Lord Cunliffe was the original project architect and has consulted on initial plans for the Exhibition Hall’s remodelling into the new Design Museum. Construction began at the end of 1960. Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II officially opened the buildings in November 1962. Its construction cost £440,000. The Exhibition Hall was listed Grade II* in 1988. Grade II* buildings are particularly important buildings of more than special interest. The Exhibition Hall’s place in the social history of Britain and its ‘swept’ roof define its listed status. It has been described as the outstanding British examples of hyperbolic paraboloid roof and as one of the most carefully thought out experiments in post-war English architecture. The works are due to begin on site in early 2012 and will be completed in 2014. The magnificent concrete and copper roof of the Exhibition Hall will be preserved. A central viewing platform will offer visitors views of the interior roof span.
From ‘Open House London: Design Museum’ promotional flyer

This blog originally appeared on 19th September 2012:  Sir Terence Conran celebrates the ‘Ground Breaking’ at the Former Commonwealth Institute.

80 year old Sir Terence Conran made no bones about the fact this was one of the best days of his life.  Having started the Design Museum in the ‘boiler room’ at the V&A and then moved to the premises in Shad Thames, the Design Museum (the new Kensington one) is destined for great things once it is esconced at the former site of the Commonwealth Institute.  Rather wonderfully for just as the Commonwealth Institute represented cultures from around the world, so too does the inspiration that Sir Terence holds for the future of design – that the Government should do all it can to encourage designers, entrepreuners and engineers and become a world renowned hub for design.  He praised many stakeholders, Chelsfield, large and small charitable organisations who had made this possible (since they don’t receive Government funding) and the confidence he had in the team of builders from Mace.  He spoke fondly of the parabola roof, the only one of its kind in the world, and hoped that the well known flag poles at the forecourt would remain there.

The occasion was to celebrate the ‘ground breaking’ and to plant a time capsule to be opened in 2112.  Ed Vaizey, the Minister for Architecture spoke, as did Deyan Sudjic (Director of the Design Museum) and Luqman Arnold (Chair of the Trustees) and the Mayor of Kensington & Chelsea, Councillor Christopher Buckmaster.  However, on this beautiful sunny morning in Kensington, with the clear blue sky, the red crane, the high viz jackets and white helmets, it was the charming but somewhat frail Sir Terence who quietly stole the show.

 

Fast Forward to 17th November 2016:  The residents of Kensington have been watching the development of Holland Green (shiny lego-brick style residential development) and the Design Museum with interest.  First came the shop – beautifully small, but as it transpired, augmented by the larger store in the Museum situated on the ground floor of Holland Green.  Then on 17th the worlds press were invited to attend a photocall with Deyan Sudjic, Terence Conran, John Pawson, and Luqman Arnold with the multicoloured backdrop of ‘Designer Maker User’.   The architecture is wonderful; the roof structure having been left mainly in-situ from its Commonwealth Institute days, and the original marble flooring has been cleaned up and provides a panel for the main back wall.  The only sadness is that the star shaped design  which used to be on the centre of the original floor was not deemed by English Heritage to be of significant historical interest, so that was not saved.  The original copper parabola roof has been kept and can be viewed from Kensington High St. and Holland Park. Judging by the amount of interest world-wide the Design Museum is set to be a world class masterpiece of design, in its own right.

22nd November 2017  The Launch Party:  Attended by at last 1200 guests and hosted by Deyan, Terence and Alexandra Schulman – this was the party of all parties.   The champagne flowed, the atmosphere tremendous, guests very ‘designer-ish’ and the speeches genuine and sincere.  The affection between Terence and Deyan was clear, with both insisting the whole venture could not have been done without the other.  This was a huge day for Terence who later admitted to me that what he was really looking forward to was watching people come into the museum on the first open day, incognito!

24 November 2017:   The day has finally come.  Considering the world-wide interest and jamboree of the past few days, the ‘cutting of the ribbon’ as it was called, was quiet and sedate.  Only two photographers, (in-house and ourselves), the Trustees, architects and staff were present.  Upon cutting the ribbon, staff cheered and clapped – the event felt like a family birthday party than a corporate occasion – more akin to a celebration of a coming of age.  Perhaps in a sense that’s what it really was.  A long journey, a vision from a gentleman who has finally achieved what he felt so certain of all those years ago.  That design has a place, not only in our lives, but in society.  Bravo!

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Images and copyright:  www.lucyelliottphotography.com

www.designmuseum.org

 

 

Marrakech through the ages – In three days

Morocco is a city of contrasts; colour, poverty, dust, antiques, donkeys, motorbikes, horse drawn carts, history, architecture, artisans and gastronomic delight.  To take all this in, in three days is quite an assault on the mind and body.

For a good place to start your tour is the new Almaha Marrakech Riad based in the the Kasbah district of Marrakech, a 20 minute walk from the main square of Jemaa-el-Fna – from where it is possible to see the whole of Morocco in a condensed state.  Almaha Marrakech which opened in February, is run by a small team.  It comprises 12 rooms and suites, the size of which places it in the ’boutique’ hotel category.  Each suite on the first floor has its own private staircase leading directly to a large roof terrace, divided into private spaces by the clever use of fencing made up of Bougainvillea.  From here you have the vantage of surveying the whole of Marrakech and beyond to the Atlas mountains.  Also on the roof terrace is a small swimming pool and a covered terrace for breakfast or dinner.  The hotel is situated in a residential area meaning that you hardly see any other tourists and become immersed in the culture quicker. We built up a good rapport with the gentleman who sold water from a kiosk just minutes from the hotel and despite walking from the main Square back to the road at night, we felt much safer than we would have done in London.  Almaha Marrakech provides excellent food and you should definitely try their speciality (and indeed Morocco’s) of lamb tagine with prune and almonds.  Off the main courtyard is the Library where a wall panel of hand-folded books features the words from the poem by Charles Baudelaires ‘L’invitation au voyage’.  Another lovely room is the Pixel Room, so named due to the 23,000 or so silk pieces of fabric manually fitted  together to represent the Mosque and surrounding area of the Jamaa-el-Fna.  Bearing in mind the heat, a spa and hamman with its various treatments on offer is very welcome. A time to reflect on all that you have seen and done during your stay.
The architecture of Marrakech is varied and beautiful – places we would highly recommend as visiting are the Medersa Ben Youssef containing the most exquisite stone carvings you have ever seen representative of the Arab-Andalusian architecture;  The Secret Garden containing two sections – one for indigenous planting and the other showcasing plants from five continents; the Virtual Museum of the Public Square which holds temporary exhibitions reflecting local heritage and culture; The Marrakech Museum with its fantastic mosaics. For a rest from serious culture, go to Jemaa-el-Fna at night and see Marrakech come alive with its informal culture; snake charmers, medicine men, tooth pullers, storytellers, acrobats, musicians and entertainers.
You can walk everywhere, but at the end of the day, after some 8 miles of walking never has a spa or a sunbed been so welcome!
Lucy and Stephen were guests of Almaha Marrakech
Almaha Marrakech, 55 Derb Ben Zina, La Kasbah, 40040 Marrakech, Morocco   www.almahamarrakech.com

Images and copyright:  www.lucyelliottphotography.com

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HRH Princess Michael of Kent launches new season of KCWC at the Royal Geographic Society

The Kensington Chelsea Women’s Club (KCWC) is a very active Club with hundreds of members.  Offering national and international women from London the opportunity to meet once a month at their General Meeting at prestigious venues across the Borough.  KCWC run courses, lectures and events, covering some 35 activities over the month – ranging from sports, languages to history.   Each month they invite a keynote speaker – in September it was HRH Princess Michael of Kent who spoke about her Anjou trilogy, the third of which ‘Quicksilver’ had recently been published.  The Princess is a rather good storyteller and gave the packed auditorium at the Royal Geographic Society an entertaining historical account (aka romp) of the royal family of France in the 15th century.  Her quick wit and self-deprecation were endearing and clearly she proved to be a most popular choice of keynote speaker to launch the 2016-2017 KCWC year.  To join or to find out more about the activities of KCWC please see www.kcwc.org.uk

Images and copyright:  www.lucyelliottphotography.com

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Radiant HRH The Princess Royal reviews Chelsea Pensioners at Founder’s Day Parade

HRH The Princess Royal officially opened the refurbished Wren designed ‘Long Wards’ whilst visiting Royal Hospital Road, home to the Chelsea Pensioners, at their recent annual Founder’s Day Parade. Dressed in pale blue and looking strikingly similar to the Queen at a young age, she enchanted the men in scarlet and showed her mother’s knack for sharing a quick joke with all she met. Sporting an Oak Leaf, symbolic of the tree King Charles II hid behind in order to avoid capture by the Parliamentary forces in 1661 at the Battle of Worcester, ‘Oak Apple Day’ as Founder’s Day is also known, is held on a day closest to King Charles II birthday (29th May) and the date of his restoration as King in 1660.  Those attending the parade represented many of the British corps, rejiments and military charities of which HRH The Princess Royal is Colonel in Chief, Colonel or Patron.

Images and copyright: Lucy Elliott, www.lucyelliottphotography
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Chelsea Flower Show 2016

This year’s Chelsea Flower Show will appeal to all types of gardeners.  From the flamboyant to the traditional, from the informal to the formal, this Show has it all.  Phillip Johnson’s 300,000 individually crochet poppies covering 21,000 sq.ft is a visual masterpiece and surely one which can never be forgotten; each poppy representing a memory of a loved one.  Elsewhere was a Heath-Robinson like garden, with moving plant pots, twirling trees and a moving flower bed.  For the more royal amongst us, the Queen was represented by a 10ft cut out of her head, filled with 10,000 flowers – a striking image used by many journalists.  The show felt more inclusive this year, taking itself less seriously, but no less impressive for that.  Keen gardeners of all ages mixed with celebrities and stars, their common love of plants uniting them in appreciating all that Chelsea has to offer.

One of the biggest surprises was the Garden Garage in the Artisan Section – a beautifully designed and tranquil area in which to house a car. Magazines and broadsheets focused on the first black designer for Chelsea, ever (which rather puts to shame the notion that gardening is for all); however, the bonus of the attention is that the RHS and wider gardening world, are rectifying this and, we hope, gardening in the future, will really be for all. As we hope Chelsea will be too.

Images and copyright: lucyelliottphotography.com
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A wine lover’s delight – The Vineyard, Stockcross, Berkshire

Wine lovers in Kensington are rather spoilt. We have the Milestone Hotel, The Royal Garden and the Kensington Wine Rooms all offering a wide variety of wines and experiences. Outside London though, just off the M40 at Newbury, is The Vineyard, a five star Relais et Chateaux hotel offering wine connoisseurs, wine lovers and novices alike, a true wine experience.

The hotel is not what you would call ‘quintessentially pretty’ – for that stick with Hartwell House, Hambleton Hall or Gravetye Manor previously featured in this magazine. But it does outdo all with the variety and types of wine on available. With over 30,000 bottles, 3000 bins and hundreds of wines on offer by the glass, the hotel is able to provide opportunity for serious wine dinners, wine tasting evenings, corporate private wine schools and ‘wine nights’.

It has hard to deny you are in a boutique ‘wine’ hotel – upon entering the reception, you are greeted with a double story height wine cellar containing 5,000 bottles. Most unnerving (but visually spectacular) is the glass floor upon which you stand looking down onto the lower level cellar. In the 3AA Rosette restaurant, our gastronomic ‘Judgement of Paris Dinner’ comprised 7 courses, with two glasses of blind wine for each course and was, according to my husband who fancies himself a wine connoisseur and foodie, “fantastic”. The Judgement of Paris was the momentous occasion in wine history, when, on 24th May 1976 top wine experts gathered together to taste six French and six Californian wines blind. Many of those who attended were amazed to find they had voted Californian wine as superior to the French. A mural in one of the meeting rooms depicts this occasion. One course was accompanied by blackened glasses, so not only was the country difficult to discerne but (rather unbelievably), also the colour.

To have seven courses and not mention any would be remiss: dishes included Leek and potato veloute with black truffle accompanied by Crozes Hermitage, Champ Morel, France 2014; Guinea fowl and partridge terrine, blood orange with walnut accompanied by Alsace PB, Marc Tempe France 2012 and Tidenham duck, heritage beetroot, quince and ginger accompanied by Bialla, Cabernet Sauvignon, California 2009. In addition to the entrance wine cellar, we were
shown around more wine vaults situated behind the main rooms of the hotel and a ‘fridge room’ on the top floor. It is probably fair to say I shall never hold a more expensive wine than the £20,000 magnum bottle of 1982 Chateau Petrus!

The rooms are generous and ours had a large seating room area with balcony overlooking the golf course, and a huge marble bathroom. If you have had enough of food and wine, there is a gym, swimming pool (indoor), Jacuzzi, steam and sauna room and treatment rooms.

The Vineyard won the European Hotel Wine List of the Year in 2015 – not surprising when their wine cellar boasts 30,000 bottles of fine wine from some of the world’s best wine producers, Sassicaia, Domaine Leflaive, Armand Rousseau to name a few In addition, the wine cellar has vintage wines including; Old and new world wines including Domaine Charles Audoin (Burgundy) and new world, Rudd Estate Mount Veeder Sauvignon Blanc (California). Unusual grape varieties, such as Orin Swift Mute which is a Californian dessert red made using native grape varieties from portugal. As I said, enough to satisfy any connoisseur, wine aficionado or novice.
The Vineyard, Stockcross, Newbury, Berks RG20
Telephone: 01635 589407
www.the-vineyard.co.uk

(Lucy and Stephen were guests of The Vineyard)

Images & Copyright: www.lucyelliottphotography.com
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Out of Kensington: Hambleton Hall, Leicestershire

For a weekend away, many consider the Cotswolds as “The Place to go” – however, just 90 miles out of London, but in a northerly direction up the A1, is Hambleton Hall. This distinctive Victorian mansion, near Oakham in the East Midlands county of Rutland, is the perfect starting point for long walks around Rutland Water or to take part in water-based leisure activities.  Hambleton, built in 1881, was originally a hunting box* and provided an ideal base for local hunts and for their social activities.

In 1979 Tim and Stefa Hart bought Hambleton Hall to create a boutique hotel. Upon arrival via a sweeping drive, a roaring fire greets you. Outside, the Great Outdoors beckons.  Most visitors come for the country air or to get some exercise. There is a swimming pool in the gardens and Rutland Water, being the largest artificial reservoir in Europe, offers plenty of other activities, such as sailing, kayaking, canoeing or windsurfing. Game shooting, riding, fox hunting or watching birds from the 31 hides is also available. Well behaved dogs are welcome and rows of Le Chameau wellingtons are available for long walks around Rutland Water.

Back inside, food and wine play a large part in the Hambleton Hall experience. Aaron Patterson is a Michelin-starred chef who originally trained at Hambleton Hall and then, after a stint at Le Manoir under Raymond Blanc, returned in 1992 as Hambleton Hall’s Director and Head Chef. The food is beautifully presented and very original – as an example we had tian of crab and cucumber, flavoured with lemongrass and ginger; rice-less squid risotto with chorizo sausage; loin of fallow venison with celeriac and chocolate and roast duck with cucumber, plums and black beans.  The menu changes daily and most of the ingredients are sourced locally, or are grown in their own kitchen garden. The innovation and taste of their meals proves yet again that restaurants outside London can easily hold their own against those in the capital.

Tim and his sommelier, Dominique Baduel, offer various wine-pairing events during the course of the year.  Dominique showed us a new acquisition that they were trialing – a type of syringe (called Corovin) where a thin needle pulls the wine out of the cork without the need to take the cork out of the bottle. The cork will then reseal the hole, meaning that expensive wines can be offered by the glass.

The 17 bedrooms are individually and traditionally decorated and all overlook the gardens and Rutland Water. The gardens are beautiful and in April tulips provide a carpet of colour. One of the highlights is to have lunch on the terrace, amid the floral display, watching the various activities on the lake.  Using Hambleton Hall as your base, there is plenty to see – Belvoir and Rockingham Castles, Burghley and Boughton House, Elton Hall and Althorp are within reasonable distance. The market towns of Uppingham, Stamford and Oakham are also a draw, offering antiques, art galleries and small independent shops. Tim also runs the Hambleton Bakery in the next door village of Exton – a very popular destination where traditional breads, fruit loaves, muffins and cakes are made on the premises.

Hambleton Hall provides a real break away with plenty to do and see in wonderful surroundings. Having many friends and relatives in Leicestershire we know it’s a favoured destination for those looking for something special and we thought it might be the same for the residents of Kensington!

Lucy and Stephen were guests of Tim and Stefa Hart
Hambleton Hall, Oakham, Leicestershire, LE15 8TH
www.hambletonhall.com 01572 756991

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Images and copyright: Lucy Elliott www.lucyelliottphotography.com

Out of Kensington: Hartwell Hotel & Spa

Sitting in 90 acres of sweeping fields, landscaped gardens, ha ha’s and a lake is the beautiful Hartwell House – an Historic House Hotel, one of only three in the UK, owned by the National Trust.

Just an hours car journey from London this historic house, built in the seventeenth century, now provides a true respite from the rush of London life. In the past carriages would have bought you to the huge wooden front door via the mile long avenue of Lime trees. Today you approach via a sweeping drive to be met by a statue of Frederick, Prince of Wales. The door opens and you are immediately in the Jacobean Great Hall – where high ceilings, works of art, antiques, traditional furnishings and a large wood burning fire place greet you.

Over the years, various architectural additions have been made resulting in architectural styles such as Jacobean, Gothic revival, Victorian and Georgian interiors. The gardens, in the style of Capability Brown, have also received various designs. As an example, and in addition to the ha ha’s, there are statues, gazeebos, follies – and the mid-section of the bridge originally formed part of Kew Bridge.

Leading to the rooms in the main house is a fine example of a Jacobean staircase complete with statues. Rooms are large with floor to ceiling windows overlooking the countryside and gardens. Our room, The Queen’s Bedroom comes complete with four poster bed, his and hers walk-in wardrobe, floor to ceiling windows, artwork, antiques, multiple sofas and armchairs. This room originally belonged to Queen Josephine when she and King Louis where exciled from France and lived at Hartwell House from 1809 – 1814.

Hartwell House is clearly a popular destination for both residents and non-residents – many were enjoying formal Afternoon Tea, and the restaurant at dinner was full with couples, groups and those attending a corporate event. Chef Daniel Richardson is locally known as the chef who bought Aylesbury Duck back on the menu – traditionally quite a difficult bird to cook and one which takes skill, especially as it is quite a fatty bird. Sadly, not being in season on our visit, we were still able to chose from an extensive menu: Pan friend scallops with apple and fennel salad, accompanied by cauliflower and lime leaves; Veloute and pan friend fillet of Hallibut with crushed potatoes, artichokes, saute leeks and crab sauce or Beetroot macaroon with goats cheese mouse as examples. Deserts were equally exotically named.

Walking around the grounds on a beautiful Autumn’s afternoon is a real treat. If walking does not give you enough excerise, there are tennis courts and a croquet lawn. The converted former stables provide elegant space for a gymnasium, large swimming pool, together with sauna, spa and beauty rooms. Again non-residents are very welcome with day spa packages being popular and a smart cafe/restaurant is on-site overlooking the pool area.

Hartwell House is well situated being close to London and Oxford and is ideal for overnight or longer stays, combining with other attractions in the area. It provides a relaxing break from London in old traditional surroundings, comfortable and classy with no bling in sight!
Lucy and Stephen were guests of Hartwell House

Hartwell House Hotel & Spa, Oxford Road, Nr Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire HP17 8NR
www.hartwell-house.com 01296 747444

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Images: Copyright:  Lucy Elliott www.lucyelliottphotography.com

‘One night at Kensington Palace’ with Joy Sigaud and the Philharmonia Orchestra

Kensington Palace and The Orangery provided a wonderful backdrop for an exclusive charity event to raise monies for the Rainbow Trust Children’s Charity and Alpha Boys School.  ’Inspirations’ founded by Joy Sigaud, is an organisation raising funds for various charities, through music events.

 

Guests were treated to champagne and canapes in the Stone Room in the Palace prior to moving on to The Orangery for the Philharmonia Orchestra, conducted by John Gibbons (Joy’s mentor) to perform a collection of Joy’s compositions selected for chamber orchestra.  ‘One Night at the Palace’ showcased Joy’s talent as a composer.

 

Born in England of Jamaican parents, Joy tells a story through her music of the movement of peoples in both an historical and contemporary context, bought to life by the passionate playing of the orchestra.  As a child she learnt to play the piano age 4 and has been composing since the age of 10.

 

The large audience comprised friends and family, together with dignitaries. Her Excellency Aloun Assamba High Commissioner of Jamaica gave an impassioned speech.  Supporters of the evening included The Jamaica High Commission, Tiffany & Co, Boodles, Donna Karan, Belgravia Gallery and many more.  A wonderful and very memorable treat for all who were lucky enough to be present.

Images and copyright:  Lucy Elliott / www.lucyelliottphotography.com

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www.jsinspirations.org

 

 

 

Out of Kensington: Beautiful, historic St. Moritz

St. Moritz, high up in the Swiss Alps, feels like entering Narnia.  Travel via the UNESCO Rhaetian Railway, the most scenic route imaginable and a few hours later reach St. Moritz.  Be greeted by liveried staff from Badrutt’s Palace Hotel and enter a different time, a different experience.  The hotel, built in 1896 epitomises luxury – an historic building filled with antiques, discrete staff, beautiful views and various restaurants to suit all types of requirements.

Most people visit in the winter months, but the summer months also have a lot to offer – plenty for all to see and do.  Try a trip on a horse drawn carriage complete with picnic hamper, to the mountain lake and swim in what must be one of the world’s most beautiful pools…. learn to make cheese in an Alpine lodge, try your hand at sailing in the ‘Badrutt’s Palace’ their own 6-person sailing boat, with the wind flying in your hair.  Shopping is provided in the hotel’s own Palace Galerie – a Bond St. in the mountains.  In addition to the hotel restaurants you can also try Chasa Veglia, a rustic style restaurant housed in one of the oldest farmhouses in St. Moritz.

For foodies, a Chefs Dinner in the kitchen, complete with silver service, followed by a ‘Charlie and the Chocolate Factory’ pudding experience in the Dessert Kitchen, is a must and will delight adults and children alike.   As for the bedrooms they are large and it is well worth trying for one overlooking the lake, which with the morning mist, looks spectacular.  Breakfast can be taken inside or on the verandah, the latter being very picturesque with flowers and again, over looking the lake.  Of course many famous people visit Badrutt’s Palace Hotel but even the less famous are treated as special. A real gem of a place and a diamond experience.

Lucy Elliott was a guest of Badrutt’s Palace Hotel

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Images: Copyright; Lucy M Elliott www.lucyelliottphotography.com
www.badruttspalace.ch